Woohoo! Earn Lifetime Commissions with Whohou

Posted from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/JohnChowDotCom/~3/swv40W-fzyI/

You can buy almost anything online these days, from makeup to musical instruments, record players to real estate. It’s easy, simple and convenient. It’s also just as easily to buy new and used items from other average, everyday people as it is to buy from bigger box stores and multinational corporations. With so many people buying so many things, there are limitless opportunities for you to tap into some really healthy income. And you don’t even need to sell anything of your own.

As you will find out in today’s review, one of the more innovative ways you can tap into this growing market is with Whohou. Never heard of it? Maybe your friends and followers haven’t either and this could represent a huge upside for you as an affiliate.

What Is Whohou and How Does It Work?

The fundamental idea behind Whohou is going to sound familiar enough. When you refer people over to the website and they complete a purchase, you get rewarded with a percentage-based commission for referring that sale.

As an affiliate, you will be provided with a unique link that you can then share as you see fit. Send it to your friends, family members and colleagues through instant messenger or text message if you want. Blast it out to your email marketing list. Promote it through social media, insert the link in your blog posts, keep a banner in the sidebar of your site… whatever you want.

Something that makes Whohou distinct from so many other affiliate programs is that it’s not just, as the affiliate, who stands to benefit from referring new customers to Whohou. The people you refer get a nice bonus too. When your referrals purchase items through the site, they can earn up to 3% cash back. This encourages them to keep buying and, when they do, you continue to earn more and more money too. It’s win-win all around. And truly, there is no catch.

A Wealth of Information?

Something that really struck me as I was trying to learn more about Whohou was how the main page of the website doesn’t look like a typical landing page or homepage. Instead, it’s very text-heavy and consists of links (and excerpts) from the Whohou blog.

This makes for a first impression that is hardly visually striking and could be an immediate turnoff for a lot of potential users who may have otherwise signed up and starting buying items from the marketplace. My first big recommendation to the people behind Whohou is to invest in a more robust and visually attractive homepage that quickly and succinctly sums up what the site is all about (and why people should sign up).

That being said, the actual blog itself is very useful for all Whohou affiliates. You learn about sharing the products you find on the site, as well as answers to some of the most frequently asked questions. It’s otherwise quite straightforward.

What Can I Buy on Whohou?

An affiliate program is only as strong as its offerings. It doesn’t matter if the commission structure is highly attractive if the actual product itself isn’t appealing. This is not a problem with Whohou.

That’s because Whohou doesn’t actually have any products of its own. Instead, it taps into the near infinite selection of eBay, arguably the world’s largest online marketplace. You can buy just about anything on Whohou that you would otherwise find on eBay. You just have to make sure you are logged into your Whohou account and find the product through Whohou to get cashback (as a buyer) and for you to earn the commission (as the affiliate).

The regular search box is located near the top of the page, but you can just as easily click on the “Browse eBay” link in the navigation bar to look around too. A number of the most popular categories are also listed along the right side of the homepage, making it quick and easy for you to browse for everything from dolls and bears to sports memorabilia and digital cameras. The product listing shows the seller’s location and feedback, as well as the potential cashback amount.

The Lifetime Commission Structure

With some of the more popular affiliate programs out there, you get paid only for the sale that you refer. That’s not the case with Whohou! The commission actually sticks with you for the lifetime of your referral. When you refer a new user who registers for an account with Whohou, every purchase the referral makes is connected to you and you earn up to 0.5% of every sale. For life.

It only takes a moment to sign up for an account and you’re just as eligible for the up to 3% cash back on your own purchases too. Payouts are made via PayPal on a net-30 basis, even if you’ve only made $10. If you can’t take PayPal from a Canadian account, you can request checks for amounts of at least $100.

Whohou may have only been in operation since last year, but it’s already paying out over $300,000 to its users and affiliates every month. Jump on board with this rapid growth and get your piece of the action.

Click Here To Download John Chow’s New eBook, The Ultimate Online Profit Model!

What I Haven’t Done In My Younger Years That Society Tells Me I Should

Posted from http://addicted2success.com/success-advice/what-i-havent-done-in-my-younger-years-that-society-tells-me-i-should/

A day doesn’t seem to fart on by without someone telling me that I should have done X when I was younger. It’s like if you haven’t done such and such by a certain age, you are a retard with no friends.

I question everything that society says we should do and you should too. Learn to ask why!

When you ask why you realize that many of the things society values are total crap. Most people can’t tell you why they do stuff which is a worry in itself.

The reason we value the below list I’m about to talk about is because that’s what we’ve always done. It may have made sense fifty years ago when we didn’t know what we know now, but it makes bugger all sense in the 21st Century.

So here’s what I haven’t done:

 

Got married

I haven’t found the right woman yet. Marrying the first girl or guy who’s nice to you because society says you have to is BS.

Do it when you find the right person or don’t do it at all. Divorce is expensive shit and I couldn’t be fucked with the drama of seeing my life fall to pieces around me because I didn’t wait for the right partner.

 

Had kids

See point one. I’m not married and last time I checked you needed a woman to have sex and create babies. But hey, I could be wrong with all this cutting edge science shit. Maybe you think about sex these days and get a woman pregnant.

Doesn’t sound like the way I’d do it but hey, whatever floats your boat, right?

Kids will happen when you are ready for them to happen – assuming you use protection everybody.

 

Bought a luxury car

Okay, so I lied. I have kind of done this one although I stopped this habit a long time ago.

Almost every investment book you’ve ever read says don’t buy a luxury car. I’ve had high-end cars and normal cars.

“The normal car I drive now still kicks ass but it doesn’t bleed me dry like the nurse does when I have a blood test”

Actually, my normal car feels better than any luxury car I’ve ever had. Who gives a rats ass what car you drive. Is anyone really fooled by all these luxury cars? Does society really not understand the car depreciates, costs a bucket load to service and doesn’t make your penis or breasts larger?

Also, do you not realize that none of these snobs driving these cars actually own the car? The bank or finance company owns the car.

The poor driver can barely afford to get out of the car and into Starbucks to buy a Grande Frappucino. As a side note, I’ve never been into Starbucks so not sure if that’s on the menu. I’m sure the coffee is just swell.

 

Bought a house

I’m not convinced a house is an absolute must. I’d rather see our younger generation become entrepreneurs and create a business that can feed them for life. A house can come when you have a family or have the money.

“Traveling the world without the hassle of a house when you’re young feels like wearing pants with no underwear – you feel free in other words”

Free like a fucking bird in the sky (I borrowed that line from some techno song called Beachball). I’m still not quite sure how bricks, cement, a bit of timber and a garage with a remote control door is supposed to completely change my life and make me happy as fucking Larry. Please explain society.

 

Done a trip around Europe

I’ll get to it when I can be assed. The planet’s not going anywhere unless you believe in superstition. I know I haven’t posted a bunch of photos of me at the Leaning Tower Of Pisa, in my Ray Bans, with my hot girlfriend who’s covered in perfect makeup as if the photo was taken off the cuff without preparation.

All these Europe photos on your social media accounts don’t make you smarter. You’re not cooler because you have been there and I haven’t. Travel is something you do when you feel like it. We all have breaks in our career and in my experience, that’s the best time to travel.

Like the time I started a business with my brother, nearly lost my mind and quit. That’s a great time to take a long ass vacation to somewhere like Europe and show your pals how freaking good you are. Having said that, make sure you travel at some stage during your life. It will change your reality.

 

Got an MBA (Masters Of Business Administration)

There are lots of peeps dropping the word “MBA” these days. For starters, it’s an acronym so that automatically makes you dumb. Secondly, the name of the university means jack shit to me.

“All that I care about is whether you know how to add value to this world in your own unique way. I have zero business education and I’d still outsell your ass, outwork your ass and out hustle your ass when it come’s to doing a startup. Business has nothing to fucking do with having an MBA”

It’s nice to have, but not fucking essential by any means. If you really need some lame ass letters after your name to sound cool, then you got bigger problems which I can’t help you with. The moment you need an MBA to validate your worth is the moment you start to live a mediocre life.

Most of what I learned about business was done on the job. It went like this: Start. Fail. Start Fail. You get my drift. It happened like this multiple times and it still happens like this today. Every failure is ten times more powerful than an MBA especially when there is a shit ton of cash involved.

There’s nothing like learning when you have your own money at stake. Not to mention, the money you need for an MBA would help me start at least three online businesses. Something to think about.

Oh, and no I’m not against university, so you don’t need to send me angry emails at 3 am in the morning when I’m trying to get my beauty sleep from writing you all of this crazy hot advice that changes your life and stuff.

 

Here’s what society should value instead:

– Your individuality and quirkiness
– Where you came from
– Love
– Happiness
– Personal growth
– Fitness
– Energy
– Passion
– Health
– Entrepreneurship (i.e., changing the world)

Now is that list long enough for ya? These are the elements of a kick ass life and this is what society should value. It’s these things ladies and gentlemen that will make your entire life worth it.

Have I missed something? Would someone please explain all of this MBA stuff to me? Will the Real Slim Shady please stand up?

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net

Letting Go Of Your Ex Is Never Easy. But We Have Ideas That Can Guide You Through It.

Posted from http://feeds.lifehack.org/~r/LifeHack/~3/PLfnNQlL6WY/letting-go-of-your-ex-is-never-easy-but-we-have-ideas-that-can-guide-you-through-it

When a relationship comes to an end it is never easy, especially if you are not the one ending it. We become so used to someone being a part of our life, and it becomes so hard to let them go and leave the past behind. We keep remembering so many happy moments and we just hope they will come running back to us. And thus we are stuck in the past, closing the doors to our future happiness.

We think we can relive the good memories

When we have invested so much of ourselves emotionally we don’t want it to end. And we wonder why the breakup happened when we were so happy. Lying down in bed at night, we relive all the good moments and the things we did to make our partner happy.

But, we need to accept the fact that memories are just memories, and we cannot relive those moment and thus we need to move forward and make new memories. The best thing to do is to look at memories as sunk costs – a sunk cost is a cost you cannot recover. The same is true for good memories – no matter how perfect and great they were they belong to the past and cannot be recovered.

So, you have two choices – either you will get stuck in the past or move forward. Being stuck in the past cannot bring you happiness, just more pain. The longer you hang on to past memories, the further away you are from future happiness.

We believe our ex was PERFECT for us

We are so quick to forget all the bad things from our relationship once we break up. As if we become blind to everything what was wrong. Our brain plays with us making us idealize and believe our memories are perfect, when the actual experience was different.

And thus we mourn as we are certain our ex was the perfect fit, and simply won’t let go and hope we will continue our relationship. We tend to ignore and reject all potential great new partners as we are certain our ex will come around and eventually come back. Justifying the fact they are worth the wait by remembering only the best moments is just making things work.

Are we so blind that we have forgotten all the things that annoyed us, all the arguments that we had because we wanted different things? We have to understand that once someone decides to break up, they have already moved on. They understood the relationship is not what they wanted and they would like to experience different things and explore their other sides.

We have an image in our head of what we think they are like, but the truth is, after the breakup, they won’t be that same person we idealized in our head. The more time we spend apart, the more they will feel like a stranger to us. So there is no point in wanting them to come back – they are just not the same person they were.

Breakups are hard, that’s the fact. And if we loved our partner so much, the idea of going through life without them is hard to sink in. But, if someone doesn’t want to be with us, it means they are not the perfect match for us, no matter what we believe. It is perfectly fine to be sad for a while, it takes time to get over someone. But obsessing with past memories for too long is not healthy for us. We cannot create our happiness by constantly looking back, but by looking forward to the future.

Featured photo credit: https://pixabay.com/ via pixabay.com

The post Letting Go Of Your Ex Is Never Easy. But We Have Ideas That Can Guide You Through It. appeared first on Lifehack.

3 Ways You Can Master Entrepreneurship Without Breaking a Sweat

Posted from http://addicted2success.com/entrepreneur-profile/3-ways-you-can-master-entrepreneurship-without-breaking-a-sweat/

Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos are two of the biggest entrepreneurial names in the business world. But while both have had wildly successful careers and developed two of the most valuable brands to this day, Bezos’ and Musk’s leadership styles differ greatly.

It’s no surprise that being a successful entrepreneur takes the perfect storm of attributes. And while there isn’t a one-size-fits-all method to entrepreneurial success, there are comparable patterns that many successful entrepreneurs such as Bezos and Musk follow.

Whether you’re just starting your career or are looking to hone your entrepreneurial skills, cultivating the right attributes and implementing the following strategies will help you further your career without risking your sanity.

1. Learn How to Self-Promote

Self-promotion is a tricky thing. Do it too much and you run the risk of coming off as braggy, pompous, or salesy. Do it too little and you run the risk of missing out on valuable connections and opportunities.

Mastering the art of self-promotion is without a doubt tricky, but if you don’t self-promote, who will? Ultimately, self-promotion is the best way to tell your story — after all, no one else knows your story like you do. You are the expert when it comes to knowing yourself.

If you’re looking to up your self-promotion game, there’s lots you can do. From something as simple as consistently posting to your social media platforms, to fostering your social influence skills, self-promotion takes many forms. For more ideas, Bruce Kasanoff wrote a great article on 40 ways to self-promote without being a jerk and artist.

“I’ve said it before, and by gosh, I’ll say it again — don’t be afraid to toot your own horn.” – Emlyn Chand

2. Establish a Task System Early On

You know the age-old saying: “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail.” For entrepreneurs, this statement couldn’t be truer. No matter how great your ideas, connections, and resume are, entrepreneurial success relies on proper planning. Failing to plan makes it difficult to have the laser-focus necessary to avoid trying to appeal to anyone and everyone, and can cost you sales as a result.

Unfortunately, many entrepreneurs focus on the end goal of executing their product or service more than they focus on planning because they consider planning too time consuming. While writing your business plan isn’t something you can tackle on your 30-minute lunch break, it’s important to put in the hours necessary to get it done. Realizing that planning is a must-have, not just a nice-to-have, is so important for entrepreneurial success.

With proper planning and establishing processes for all aspects of your operations, your startup can avoid losing sales, especially if you run an online business. It may take some trial and error and adjustments to your original plan to figure out the right task system for you, but it’s important to do so.

Not sure where to start? Set some time aside to read about successful businesses and the entrepreneurs who built them. During your research, be sure to take notes and outline a rough draft of your business plan along with task systems and processes that make sense for you.

In the end, taking the time to devise a plan and establish a task system will help you concentrate on your goals, track your progress, identify risks in advance, and understand failures and how to remedy them.

3. Be Open to Change

If there’s one attribute all successful entrepreneurs share it’s that they are open to change. Change isn’t always easy — especially for those who prefer to be in control — but being open to change and learning to adapt isn’t just a success skill, it’s a survival skill.

Sure, being passionate about what you do is a necessary attribute of all entrepreneurs, but being stubborn isn’t. Entrepreneurial ventures are uncertain by nature and being inflexible about client or market needs will lead to failure.

As an entrepreneur, you’ll likely find that the path you originally envisioned in your head is totally different than how your product or service is executed. As a result, you may have to change your product or service to adapt to your unique situation. Entrepreneurs who embrace change find that it’s easier to keep moving forward. It’s important to remember that change doesn’t symbolize failure, but symbolizes growth.

Of course, change can be scary, but it doesn’t have to be. Successful entrepreneurs know that their venture is not just about doing what they believe is good, but also making a thriving business out of it.

You can embrace change in lots of ways — by welcoming suggestions from others, checking your ego at the door, and learning how to fail correctly.

“The measure of intelligence is the ability to change.” – Albert Einstein

The journey to becoming a successful entrepreneur isn’t as easy as going from Point A to B. Throughout your career, you’ll be challenged, tested, and thrown curveballs. But by cultivating the right attributes like learning the art of self-promotion, planning, and being open to change, it’ll make the journey much more enjoyable.

What are some attributes you have that have helped you on your journey? Let us know by writing in the comments below!

Image courtesy of Twenty20.com

How To Move from a Good to Great Content Marketing Strategy

Posted from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/JohnChowDotCom/~3/V1gl85aFweM/

It’s just not good enough to have a good content marketing strategy because with all the competition, you need to find a way to really stand out. Next, with social media marketing growing, bloggers are finding it very easy to get their content in front of people quickly with so much more ease. However, it’s NOT too difficult making the transition from a “good” to “great” content marketing strategy. Over the years, I’ve been able to experiment with different marketing strategies utilizing PPC, banners, email, and content marketing. It’s important you test and tweak along the way to ensure you get the highest conversion rates. For example, what good is a content marketing strategy if you’re NOT able to convert your readership to obtain your bottom line? If you have a content marketing strategy that is simply “good”, then implement these following changes to make it great.

Let’s jump right in and explore some of these options.

Be a Clear Leader

Many of you are probably wondering what I mean by this statement and the explanation is very simple. First, it’s important to observe who is responsible for your content because these will be the people who will be implementing your vision. Personally, I write my own content but sometimes I do hire writers to implement my vision into my content marketing strategies. I’m a great writer, but lack the conversion part so will work with people to make sure everything is done correctly before publishing. Next, as your business grows, you’ll have less time to write content so it’s important you’re a “great” leader, able to express your thoughts to the people you work with.

Here’s what you need to understand…

For you to make the jump from “good” to “great”, you have to be able to manage a team through strong leadership skills. You have to help them feel comfortable when working with you so you can communicate your thoughts openly. The more people are clear about your vision, the harder they can work at making it come true. Know what you want so you can share it with the people you work with and are responsible for creating epic content.

Know Your Objective

I can’t count the number of times I did a poor job simply because I didn’t know my objective. No matter how good of a writer you are, it won’t matter if you aren’t clear about what you want to achieve. Imagine how many times you’ve sat down to write content without doing any research and when you finished, the article lacked substance. If you’re NOT clear about your objective, you’re NOT going to take the necessary steps to create epic content. Here’s an example,

I wanted to publish a complete guide on guest blogging, making it epic with no other resources like the one I was about to create. However, I knew it had to be different and I needed to put a twist on it so it would stand out compared to others online. In the end, I did research for 2 months, skimming through all my competitors so I can add elements to my guide NOT available anywhere else. The guide is over 10,000+ words, but there’s nothing like it anywhere on the Internet. You can check it out here. Here’s the point…

I was clear about what I wanted to achieve and this allowed me to take the necessary actions to create something epic. If you want to transition from “good” to “great” content, then be clear about your objective so you have guidelines you can follow going forward.

Know Your Audience

Content can only be GREAT when you have people to critique once published. Think about how and why products are labelled as “awesome”, “epic”, “great”, etc. They are only labelled because experts within your niche have put their stamp of approval on your content. However, I’m NOT referring to getting experts involved because in the end, you’re writing for your audience. You’re writing for people who trust your expertise and want to learn from the content you provide. In this day and age, we have a solid system to designate our content as GREAT starting with…

  • Visitors will leave comments
  • They’ll share with others through social media
  • They’ll link back to it or even reference it in their content

Here’s my point…

Before writing, you have to know your audience so you have a system in place to label your content. If you don’t know your audience, then you can’t guide your content writing, which leaves you with an empty room after publishing. Know your audience then write your content so people are around to give you credit and praise your expertise.

Always Provide Value

Think about the content you find useful and you’ll notice it’s always provided you with substance. If you want to make the transition from “good” to “great” content, then consider finding ways to improve your content before and after publishing. First, always write content keeping your audience in mind and some of the concerns they have in your niche. Next, make sure your content is the ONLY one people need to read to find a complete solution. For example, start by researching problems in your niche then offering a complete solution using text, videos, images, and infographics.

Google, over the last year, has put a lot of emphasis on the “freshness” update in their algorithm. Going forward, Google will reward websites that regularly update their content because it enhances the user search experience. You should take advantage of this change and always update your content so you stay ahead of the trend. The more you update your content, the higher engagement you’ll notice through your readership. Great content is NOT created in one day and it takes time to publish something of value so keep your content fresh while making it as relevant as possible. You’ll know you have great content simply by the reaction of others.

Click Here To Download John Chow’s New eBook, The Ultimate Online Profit Model!

How to Do What You Don't Want to Do (but Have to Do Anyway)

Posted from http://feeds.lifehack.org/~r/LifeHack/~3/N6qtLJwi9Bg/how-to-stay-productive-and-do-what-you-dont-want-to-do

Do you feel like your chores are piling up around you? Whether you’re inundated with housework, or you have a growing list of nagging tasks to complete at work, you are probably overwhelmed and frustrated. We’ve all been there, and we’ve all balked at completing these menial jobs.

As much as we’d rather go on an adventure or tackle that exciting work project, everybody has to spend time doing things they don’t enjoy. Your productivity and happiness is at stake if you can’t clear minor tasks out of the way. Most of these jobs take no longer than a few minutes to complete, but they can compound into a mountain of work if left unattended. It doesn’t have to be this way.

Every exciting work includes some tedious tasks, it’s inevitable.

Regardless of how your chores make you feel, you still have to do them. Having a negative view of your duties sets you up for failure. Instead of thinking of them with disdain, turn to them with gratitude. Even the most exciting assignments at work come with a certain amount of administrative baggage.

Know that hacking through the red tape, filling out the forms, and answering your emails is just a means to get to the work that you enjoy. Envision how much more productive, healthy, and happy you will be if you keep up with your chores.

To accomplish things you don’t feel like doing, plan your tasks with strategies.

Balance your day.

Use the Pomodoro technique to maximize your time without burning yourself out. Start by establishing your to-do list and grouping similar items on your list. Then, work for a solid 25 minutes on your first task or set of tasks. Take five minutes to recharge your batteries, and repeat the pattern. After you have worked for four 25-minute intervals, take a 20-minute break.[1] By working this way, you spend about 75% of your time on task and 25% at rest.

Make routine tasks automatic.

Forwarding your emails to a single address can keep you from having to open several email services. Most email services also give you the option to set up filters to automatically sort your messages. If you generate the same types of documents or messages over and over, come up with a standard template. You can still customize your work, but it is a lot easier to change a few details in your message than it is to reinvent the wheel every day. Automating processes such as paying your bills and refilling your prescriptions means that you won’t have to spend your lunch break doing tedious tasks.[2]

Make chores part of your schedule.

Block out time for them the same way you set aside time for appointments. Incorporate practices like the “One Touch Rule” to save time.[3] This rule requires you to take care of items right away so that you only handle them one time. For example, instead of throwing junk mail into a pile on your desk, throw it in the trash right away.

Do the things that require the most effort first.

Knock out your most challenging work early in the day. These might be things that require the greatest amount of creativity, or they could be the chores that you hate doing the most. You are less likely to experience decision fatigue[4] early in the day, and your levels of self-control will be higher.[5] You don’t want to spend all day dreading a task and then be too exhausted to complete it.

Complete tasks in batches.

When you tackle similar and related tasks in the same block of time, you will be able to complete them more quickly. Have a portion of your day set up specifically for making phone calls or completing orders. Designate times to check your email, and silence unnecessary notifications. Multitasking is rarely as effective as sustained focus on a single task.[6]

Turn completing chores into a game and reward yourself.

Think about things that make you happy and try to connect your chores to them. If it’s a vacation that you crave, agree to put a few dollars in the travel fund for each day that you clear all the items out of your incoming and outgoing files. You not only get the benefit of thinking about that vacation, but you also turn completing your chores into a game.[7]

Ask for help when necessary.

Depending on your position, you may be able to get some additional help with those chores. It is often less expensive to enlist an experienced helper than it is to waste valuable time trying to teach yourself how to do everything well.[8] Even if you don’t have the power to hire an assistant, you can still have an honest discussion with your manager or coworkers if your workload is untenable.

If you want to make your chores more manageable, keep up with them.

Edward Young once said,

“Procrastination is the thief of time.”

Putting off chores today only compounds the amount of time you’ll need to spend on them later. When you approach menial tasks with a positive attitude and complete your chores efficiently, you’ll have more time to enjoy the things you love.

Featured photo credit: Stocksnap via stocksnap.io

Reference

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How Not To Turn Meaningful Discussions Into Arguments By Keeping This 1 Thing In Mind.

Posted from http://feeds.lifehack.org/~r/LifeHack/~3/U2deg5BiA4k/how-not-to-turn-meaningful-discussions-into-arguments-by-keeping-this-1-thing-in-mind

When in the midst of a discussion, all we really want is to be heard, and for our point of view to be considered. But sometimes in the heat of the moment if a conversation isn’t going our way, we can get defensive; escalating a friendly discussion into a full blown argument.

A lot of the time this happens without us even meaning to, and we lose control of the situation. We want our views to be understood. But sometimes while explaining our stance we might not realize that we are offending the other people involved in the discussion, turning it into something ugly and running away from the initial point.

The most volatile environment that this could happen is in the work place. You want to appear to be informed and articulate, so you engage with your coworkers about a politically inspired debate. This is an incredibly touchy subject regardless, so approach with caution when flinging your hard-pressed beliefs out in the open. (I don’t agree with the following example but bear with me for a moment). Say that you don’t believe that women should get equal pay in the workplace, because men have to spend more money to please their women. You could have been half-joking when you said it, but now every woman in the office probably hates you, along with many feminist empathizing men. There’s nothing wrong with shaking things up a bit, but think before you speak.

The same goes for friends and family. You don’t need to be as cautious because it’s not going to affect your professional career, but you also don’t want to offend those closest to you. Let’s suppose that you came from a small town, but moved to the big city to find your place in the rat race. When you return home, you view everyone as just doing the same old thing. While that may be true, be careful on how you word things if you decide to bring this up. Don’t use words like, “towny,” because now you’re offending even the people you returned home to see.

The original issue has now turned into a huge conflict.

Now not only do you need to backtrack to get your original point across, but you have to do some damage control to alleviate the situation that is now getting blown out of proportion. The original issue is now no longer relevant, and what should have been a friendly discussion is turning into a huge mess.

When people feel that they are being attacked or judged, they will immediately become defensive and retaliate. The conversation will shift into justifications for their behavior or beliefs that they feel you have been insensitive to, and the remainder of the discussion will consist of you trying to calm them down to realize what you actually meant, and return to your initial point.

It’s not a very good look for you, coming across as judgmental and not accepting of other’s point of view. That may have not been your intent at all, but because of poor word choices, you appear to be that way. Now others are judging you for being judgmental. Exhausting, isn’t it?

Emotions are on the rise and have taken control of the situation. Now all of your efforts are directed at diffusing the situation, and you may not ever get a chance to explain yourself.

Why do we get so defensive?

I think we all know that one person that is next to impossible to speak to, because we know that any little thing will put them on the defensive and shut you out. If you don’t know anyone like this, then maybe it’s you. But why does it happen?

1. Not feeling respected, or that you’re being heard.

Sometimes we react impulsively, or don’t realize the weight of our words until we’ve already said them. Then the recipient of our comments doesn’t exactly take it so well, and the original point has been lost.

Example: You’re unhappy with your boyfriend because he doesn’t seem to have any time for you. You try to talk it out with him, but your first point is that he makes you feel like he doesn’t care. Now, all of his efforts have been belittled, and he feels like you don’t appreciate all that he does for you. It blows up into an argument of accusing each other of not caring, and the original issue doesn’t get resolved.

2. We directly make judgments without explaining ourselves clearly.

Our brains are hard-wired to switch gears into our Self Protective System if we feel that we ar e being attacked verbally, physically, or mentally. Our brains don’t only react to situations instinctively, but reasonably as well to preserve our physical and psychological well-being. What’s interesting about our self-protective systems is that they are not learned. They are genetically manufactured, along with the other facets of our DNA and personality traits. From early childhood we will exhibit this instinct to protect ourselves.

Example: As a small child, you are trying to finish a puzzle before the end of playtime. Now the teacher is saying playtime is over, and you need to put the puzzle away even though you haven’t finished it. In your small developing mind, you feel that the teacher is undermining your ability to finish the puzzle, so you throw a temper tantrum that will nearly drive the teacher to tears.

How to diffuse an issue before it escalates:

1. Mirror the other person after they speak, to let them know that you are listening.

Example: If you’re in the workplace and your coworker suggests an action that you don’t agree with, you can respond by saying that you understand their idea to (reiteration of suggestion) although you think it might be helpful to look at it from another perspective as well, and perhaps find a solution that encompasses both.

2. Avoid using the word “but”.

The word just has a negative ring to it in the midst of a discussion. For example: “I hear what you’re saying, but-“ with just that one word, you have completely undermined the other person. By adding the word but, you are saying that what you are about to say next is more important than the point that they already made.

3. Don’t make judgments or speak about your own emotions without explanation.

Which of these sentences sounds better to you?

“You never take my suggestions seriously.”

“I feel frustrated because you haven’t responded to few of my previous emails, is it because you don’t find my comments to be useful?”

The first sentence is incredibly accusing, and will immediately put the recipient on the defensive. In the second example, the sender fully explains their feelings on the matter, and give the recipient a chance to explain themselves as well.

4. Invite them to give comments so they feel respected.

After voicing your opinion, ask the other person or people in the discussion to voice their opinions on the matter as well, so they know that their thoughts are valued.

Featured photo credit: criticallyrated via google.com

The post How Not To Turn Meaningful Discussions Into Arguments By Keeping This 1 Thing In Mind. appeared first on Lifehack.

5 Ways You Can Use Facebook Groups to Benefit Your Blog

Posted from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/OhKIG8hITD0/

5 Types of Facebook Groups for Bloggers

When you think of using Facebook for your blog, what comes to mind?

Declining organic reach? Pay to play? Sharing endless memes just to get engagement? Posting your latest blog post only to hear crickets?

But hang on, didn’t all the conversation move from our blog comments to Facebook? Well, yes, that’s where a lot of conversation is happening because that’s where a lot of our audience hangs out now, somewhere among the 1.28 billion people who login to Facebook daily to spend their (on average) 20 minutes.

3 days ago Facebook ticked over the major milestone of 2 billion monthly users, over half of whom use Facebook groups. That’s right, more than 1 billion people are using Facebook groups. That’s where the conversation and community is happening and it’s something you can easily create for your blog.

Here’s how you can move to where the conversation is and develop community for your blog in 5 different ways with Facebook groups.

1. Groups for your eCourse or other Education

One of the most common uses of Facebook groups by bloggers are ones set up to support a course or an event. Before Facebook, many bloggers used private forums on their blog, or used comments following the course content for any conversation with participants.

Now, most bloggers use Facebook to set up a group where their course participants can ask questions and support each other as they move through the course.

One of the main considerations is what to do when the course ends.

Do you close the group?

Do you step out and let the participants stay in touch and manage the group themselves?

Do you keep the group and add new intakes of course members to the same group?

The latter is a great way to manage a group for those courses that have a definitive start and end date with the blogger providing a lot of input during each course intake. In between intakes the blogger can pull back a bit and let the conversation be more self-sustaining.

This is how blogger Nicole Avery (also our productivity expert for ProBlogger) manages her Planned and Present course, which is great for members who may not have completed the course at the same pace as it was delivered. Nicole provides evergreen access to the course materials and having an ever active group of members means you can jump back in at any time for the support you need.

planned and present ecourse.png

An alternative is to close each group as the course ends, or move the members to more of a self-managed alumni group. Consider this if you feel like managing a group full time may burn you out.

For an evergreen course where people can join and start the course at any time, or for a free group like the ProBlogger Community which has an education focus, be prepared to be ‘on’ all the time. Having a structure and content plan for your group will help you manage it. As it grows you may need to consider asking moderators to help you as admins for the group.

2. Mastermind and Membership Groups

As bloggers we are usually flying solo, or working in virtual teams. Gone are the chats around the ‘office water cooler’ and Friday night office drinks. You can’t just stop by desk of a colleague or set up a brainstorming meeting in the boardroom.

In recent years, blogger masterminds meetups have become really popular – either as a component of an event like Chris Ducker’s Tropical Think Tank event (where Darren spoke a few years ago) or as events themselves. They give bloggers the opportunity to bounce ideas off each other and use the collective experience at the table to help advance each member.

With the cost and logistics of getting together on a regular basis being a barrier, many masterminds are now organised online through the use of regular group video calls like Skype or Google Hangout. A Facebook group is a great way to organise the group and provide opportunity for interaction between mastermind sessions. I’m part of a small self-organised mastermind group of bloggers that has started using a Facebook group to supplement our regular calls. It’s far more interactive than contacting each other via email.

Dan Norris Mastermind.png

Another type of Mastermind group that works well, without the structure of video meetings, is a larger collection of members who pay to be part of the group. A good example of this is Dan Norris’ Mastermind Group (above) which started as the 7 Day Start Up group. Dan initially started a free public group, which grew quickly and became very busy. Dan then offered a smaller group which members could join for an annual fee. This has resulted in a group of quality members with a breadth of experience who are there to learn from and help each other. The difference is that they have skin in the game, they’ve paid to be there and are not just dropping in and out to promote themselves or solicit.

3. Create a Support/Community Group for your Readers

Blogging Facebook groups don’t have to be about blogging and for bloggers. This type of group is less about you and more about your audience. Starting a group for your subscribers or readers helps to bring the conversation back to your own turf. When comments started migrating from our blogs to Facebook posts (which quickly disappear into your feed history), many bloggers mourned that shift. Conversation was fleeting, and if you looked at the blog it didn’t look like there was a community anymore.

A Facebook group for your readers creates a new home for conversation, and as a closed group, often a more honest and transparent interaction both with your readers and between them. When the Facebook algorithm reduced organic reach of pages, many bloggers started groups as a way to promote their posts and salvage traffic to their blogs.

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Stacey Roberts of Veggie Mama started her group thinking it might fill the gap of falling organic reach, but it evolved into something much better. The Veggie Mama Gang is less about her blog and more about her readers supporting, entertaining and generally hanging out with each other. Sure, the talk occasionally reverts to recipes, but it has become so much more than that. For Stacey it has allowed her to get to know her readers in a much more real way, and she enjoys the connections being made between readers too – a hallmark of great community.

Stacey doesn’t actively promote the group – it’s a secret group which her readers can join by emailing her.

4. Groups for Reader Feedback

Closely related to a community group for your blog, is a group with a more specific brief. One that helps you garner feedback from your readers on something you are creating. Kelly Exeter from A Life Less Frantic has used Facebook groups to help her write her books.

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Kelly Exeter is currently working on her fourth book, Overthinkers Anonymous. This group is for fellow overthinkers (she is one too) who are interested in the interesting things she turns up during the researching for and writing of the book.

Kelly invite her regular readers to join the group and provide feedback on things like concepts that she’s trying to articulate through to preferences for book cover artwork. It’s a great collaboration and her readers feel a part of the development of the book, and therefore the final product. It’s both crowdsourcing and marketing perfection – creating something based on what people actually want and is relevant to them.

Similarly, you could create a group to invite readers to be beta-testers of a new course you are creating, or to discuss ideas for posts that you can write for the blog. There really is no limit on what you could ask your community for feedback on. At the end of the day, involving them in the process is the most valuable part.

5. Groups to Grow your List

Back in the day, your blog was where people discovered you, either via a search, social media or a referral from a friend. These days the way someone first discovers you is just as likely to be a Facebook group. When someone finds a community they feel a part of, they’re more likely to invite others to join. With the bonus of Facebook suggesting groups to other friends, a Facebook group is a great way to curate potential subscribers to your blog and email list.

Jill and Josh Stanton from Screw the Nine to Five use their Facebook group as the top of their funnel. Instead of driving people to sign up to their email list, Jill and Josh actively promote their group. You can see here on Twitter where they’ve created a domain which is forwarded to their Facebook group.

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Their rationale is that you’re more likely to warm up to them and what they offer in a group, as part of an evident community, than being solely on the receiving end of an autoresponder email series. The next step is to earn your email address, once you’re already warmed up and engaged with them in the group. You can learn more about how they’ve done this via this great interview with Natalie Sisson.

 

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Nikki Parkinson from Styling You also uses a group to grow her community and facilitate her popular #everydaystyle challenges. Whilst you can join it directly via the Groups button on her Facebook page, she also uses the group as an opt-in for her email list. If you stumble on her group you’ll be prompted to sign up to her email list via one of the questions available to group admins when people request to join.

Both the Screw the Nine to Five and Styling You Everyday Style Community pages are sizeable, thriving communities. Darren interviewed Nikki on the podcast recently where she revealed there is a comment every 5 seconds in the group and she has 3 personal assistants moderating and managing the group. The Screw the Nine to Five group has grown to over 45,000 members and has become so noisy that Jill felt it ‘lost the magic’ because of people using it as a platform for their own self promotion, rants and research. So Jill and Josh are closing their group and starting a new one on July 1.

One of the biggest issues for them was the amount of “admin time required to delete all of the ‘bullsh*t’ posts” (Jill is quite sweary!). So, if you’re considering a larger group that isn’t gated by purchasing a product or course, then you will want to ensure you have firm rules and expectations set about how you want the group to run. You can check out the new rules Jill has put in place for their new group here. Facebook has also announced new tools for admins to manage their groups, including Group analytics, membership request filtering, removed member clean-up, scheduled posts and group-to-group linking.

So, are you ready to start a group for your blog? What type? Maybe you already have a group? Tell us about it in the comments below.

The post 5 Ways You Can Use Facebook Groups to Benefit Your Blog appeared first on ProBlogger.

      

How to Make Someone Who's Angry at You Suddenly Become Nice (Even If He's a Stranger!)

Posted from http://feeds.lifehack.org/~r/LifeHack/~3/AKJynf0SQ7A/how-to-make-a-person-whos-angry-at-you-suddenly-become-nice-even-if-hes-a-stranger

We’ve all found ourselves in situations where someone is angry with us. It could be a spouse, friend, co-worker, or even a stranger! And if you’re someone who likes everyone to be happy and nice, then these instances make you uncomfortable. You want to solve the problem and make things better. But how do you make a person who’s angry at you suddenly become nice?

4 Steps to Fix the Situation

Every situation is unique and you’ll have to determine how to best approach an angry person in the moment. However, in most cases, the following tips and techniques apply.

1. Don’t Retaliate

The number one rule is to avoid retaliation. No matter what someone does, you can’t attack back. This will only make the person angrier. A common example of this is when someone gets angry and cuts you off in traffic because you’ve been driving slower than they’d like. If you respond by cutting them off, this will infuriate them even more.

As hard as it can be, never repay an angry action with another angry action. Even though you feel disrespected, you have to put your pride aside and move on. Make sure you don’t come across as sarcastic, though, as this can infuriate an angry person even more.

2. Show Your Care

Instead of acting angry, show the person that you care about their situation. You’ll find that angry people are often that way because they feel misunderstood. Taking the time to listen may be enough to change their attitude. Depending on the situation, here are some good lines:

  • Can you tell me what’s wrong? Maybe I can help.
  • I’m sorry you feel that way. Is there something I can do?
  • This should have never happened. How are you feeling?

Little lines like these are enough to get the angry person talking. You may eventually be able to help them see past the problem by letting them talk it out.

3. Make Yourself Human

If the angry person is directing their malice towards you, the quickest way to reduce frustration is by making yourself seem more human. Tell them how their anger makes you feel – i.e. scared, confused, or anxious – and be sure to let them know that you mean no harm in your words or actions.

4. Lighten the Mood

You have to be careful with this technique, but a mean person can often be quelled by lightening the mood. Consider telling a joke, flashing a smile, or adding perspective to something that isn’t really that big of a deal. Knowing when to do these things will get you far in life.

Don’t Let Someone Else Ruin Your Day

When it’s all said and done, it’s impossible for you to control someone else’s emotions. No matter how hard you may try, some angry people just want to remain angry. If at all possible, don’t let them ruin your day. Choose kindness and you’ll be the better person.

The post How to Make Someone Who’s Angry at You Suddenly Become Nice (Even If He’s a Stranger!) appeared first on Lifehack.

How We Are Attracting Fake News and False Information to Our Lives

Posted from http://feeds.lifehack.org/~r/LifeHack/~3/h-ULymVy40Q/how-to-overcome-confirmation-bias-and-recognize-false-information

A new phenomenon is taking the internet by storm, but in the worst of ways. Many of us have fallen victim to “Fake News.” And further perpetuate the issue by sharing this misinformation and regurgitating it as fact.

The news was once a trusted facet where we could inform ourselves of current events. But times have changed. With endless resources at our disposal, we are constantly confronted with news stories and studies that lack fact-checking and credibility. While these news sources are certainly in the wrong, we as readers are contributing to the issue and making it worse.

Perhaps it’s because these fake news stories appeal to our personal ideals, so we accept them as fact. Or maybe, it’s because we want to be the first one to share this information with our peers, appearing as if we are always in the know.

Our fear of missing out could be the culprit to our attraction to fake news.

The Fear of Missing Out (also known as FOMO) is the common condition with a pretty self-explanatory concept. We all want to be caught up on the latest news. It is part of the human condition to want to be informed. Therefore, when we see breaking news on the internet, we are inclined to share the stories to educate our peers.

The huge issue with this is that many people don’t make it past the headline. Without even reading the articles, we share them on multiple social media outlets such as Facebook or Instagram, not even realizing what we are actually sharing.

In our effort to feel superior and informative, we are actually showing our peers how ignorant and gullible we are.

When we passively take in information, we blindly fall victim to bias.

Do you have a favorite go-to news source? Are you sure that it’s credible? Sometimes when we find a news outlet that appeals to our concerns and ideals, we passively take in the information, and don’t even think to challenge the “facts.”

For example, individuals who consider themselves to be extremely right winged politically tend to gravitate towards Fox News and bash any news sources that dare contradict any of their news stories. They have developed a bias, and will reject any information that doesn’t follow their agenda.

Many of us do this without realizing it, and are negatively influenced by authoritative sources. There are three types of bias to look out for:

  • My-Side Bias- the kind of bias that gets formed when you’re in a collaborative group with strong ideals. You will gravitate towards information that confirms your group’s objective.
  • Authoritative Bias- a logical reasoning fallacy where you will refer to an authoritative source to either confirm or deny information. (Ex. Fox News. If they do not agree with the information, then it must not be true.)
  • Confirmation Bias- blinds people from being objective to facts. We don’t want to believe that we are wrong, so we will dismiss information that contradicts our beliefs. We will limit our intake of new information that does not resonate with our pre-existing beliefs.

To stop taking in false information, start with removing unreliable sources.

Evaluate the source of information.

How credible is this source really? Why do you take their word for fact, and is there perhaps some bias involved? Think about why you started to follow this individual or news source to begin with, and if it is still relevant to your current interests.

For example, maybe you started to follow a public figure because he was a really funny guy who shared a lot of jokes and funny videos. At the beginning he only shared about some nonsense jokes or funny things he did every day. But later, he started to joke about issues related to different races or sexual orientation. Be smart enough to know whether the information is valid or whether the public figure’s stance on something align to what you truly believe. Don’t just blindly follow what he believes without processing the information.

Try to disconnect from Facebook.

Much easier said than done, as this is a deep-seeded urge that we all have. FOMO typically stems from unhappiness, and a need for attention.[1] How do we dispel these urges?

Disconnecting is one option. I know, I know. You just CAN’T LIVE without constantly checking into social media. But here’s the thing. You existed and survived without it before, you can do it again. Don’t go cold turkey, but just try to do it less. You have no idea how free and peaceful your mind will become when you stop overwhelm your brain with unnecessary information.

Search for different perspectives, always.

Don’t rely on one source for all of your information.[2] Look for opposing viewpoints on the subject that you’re looking into the get an even keel of the situation. You may realize something that you hadn’t noticed before and change your position on the matter.

Identify your stance on the subject, and look for contradictory evidence to disprove that fact. That might seem silly, but it is the only way to truly know if your opinion is concrete.

If in a group of people, ask each individual their opinion separately, as to not let them be influenced by the position of others.

Use the rule of three.[3] Identify three possible hypothesis for the subject to look at it from every angle. Three is the magic number because there is enough variation to get a solid overview of the subject, but not so much information that it gets confusing and the point is lost.

Featured photo credit: Stocksnap via stocksnap.io

Reference

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